Backpacking Vietnam Part 6: Empires and Handicrafts in Hoi An

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Published on Monday, January 25th, 2010 Uploaded by: mgutierrezgj

Backpacking Vietnam Part 6: Empires and Handicrafts in Hoi An Long-established religions in Vietnam have included Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism so when we heard of ancient Hindu temples in the middle of Vietnam, we knew we had to see it for ourselves. We were not disappointed. The temple ruins were spectacular and the history of the Champa people will blow your mind. I'm still not 100% sure how we ended up on this tour as we love exploring places on our own time but it was a nice break from the constant planning even if it did end up in a handicraft village where we appreciate all the skill and hard work that goes into what they're doing but because we're scrubby, homeless backpackers there is no way we can lug around that sandalwood buddah... so now we just look really cheap and mean. All in all, in was a great day. Also, we still say, "And get on Tom and Jerry... Ovadere!" in the voice of our crazy, straight out of Looney Tunes character of a guide. Noah's impression is pretty spot on. Some people have attainable goals like getting more exercise, reading more books. I just really, really want to nail that voice. FOLLOW THE BEARD! Instagram - http://instagram.com/becausewecamp Blog/Website - http://www.becausewecamp.com FaceBook - https://www.facebook.com/becausewecamp MUSIC 'The Joy of a Morning Sunrise' by Brain Control Jamendo - http://artists.jamendo.com/en/home 'St James Infirmary' by ProletR Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/roy-3/sets/proletr Shot on GoPro Hero 3 Black Edition Script: After about an hour and a half at the ruins, we all piled back on the bus for the 4th time that day to rendezvous with the boat that would take us back to Hoi An. Unfortunately, the ride to the dock was significantly longer and bumpier than expected. while the boat ride back to Hoi An is definitely a more comfortable than the bus; it's also less direct and takes longer due to a stop off at a wood working handy craft village. Long-established religions in Vietnam have included Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism so when we heard of ancient Hindu temples in the middle of Vietnam, we knew we had to see it for ourselves. From the 4th to the 14th century AD, the valley at Mỹ Sơn was a site of religious ceremony for kings of the ruling dynasties of Champa, it is said that the ancestors of the Cham probably migrated from the island of Borneo and records of their kingdom go as far back as the second century AD At its height, there were over 70 temples here at my Son and all were dedicated to the hindu god Shiva. The Champa Kingdom was strong and the construction techniques they used on the temples are still not completely understood to this day but Between the rise of the Khmer Empire in Cambodia and Vietnam's territorial push to the south, the Champa kingdom began to shrink and eventually fell during the 15th century and so the My Son complex fell into disuse and was largely forgotten. It was rediscovered in 1898 by a french scholar and by the 1930s, restoration on the temples began. Today, approximately 99,000 Cham people still live in Vietnam but are only recognized as a minority, and not as an indigenous people by the Vietnamese government.Tensions between the government and Cham people still play out today so being able to catch a glimpse into this once untouchable empire was surreal.

Category Other Tag vietnam backpacking budget travel hoi an my son temple boat Location Hoi An